Other

Severe New Year's Eve could be prevented


Bilirubin is a degraded enzyme that is inactive in many newborns. The resultant accumulation of bilirubin can lead to diarrhea, which is mostly harmless to the baby's skin.

Severe New Year's Eve could be prevented

In some cases, however, bilirubin may accumulate at toxic levels in infants' brain. Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine have identified a white protein that inhibits the enzyme responsible for the degradation of bilirubin. By blocking the white of NCoR1, enzymatic degradation of bilirubin is released, thus providing a new therapy for treating severe neoplasm. their results are published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Newborns at birth are exposed to high levels of oxygenwhich results in the transient but rapid depletion of blood cells and the outflow of bilirubin into the blood stream. Bilirubin is degraded by the enzyme UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1). In their absence, bilirubin results in high levels, encephalopathy (cerebral dysfunction), seizures, severe brain damage and even death.Shujuan Chen, PhD, adjunct professor of pharmacology at UC San Diego School of Medicine, examining mice for enzyme function. The original UGT1A1 gene was replaced in mice with the human version of the gene. While normal mice did not develop puberty at birth, researchers have experienced severe neuter hyperbilirubinemia in neonatal mice. The UGT1A1 gene was deactivated in the liver in neonatal humanized mice, much like in humans. In the gastrointestinal tract, a protein called nuclear corepressor protein 1 (NCoR1) inhibited its function. Recent disabling of UGT1A1 in mice resulted in hyperbilinaemia. can be treated with light therapy and bleeding.
- New Year's Eve
- Baby is a baby